Sexual Assault Outreach

Titan Athletes produced an "Its On Us" video in Spring 2016 to affirm that all Titans have a responsibility for helping to shape a campus culture free of sexual violence and sexual assault!

Illinois Wesleyan University will not tolerate sexual assault of any kind, including that of date or acquaintance rape. Attempted rape or sexual assault is also prohibited. Sexual violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against an individual will; or where an individual is incapable of giving consent due to the use of drugs or alcohol or because of intellectual or other disabilities.

To better understand students' experiences of sexual violence on campus, Illinois Wesleyan University took part in the HEDS Consortium Sexual Assault Campus Climate Survey in Spring 2015. An overview of the information collected is represented in this summary report, and has been widely shared in a number of venues across campus. Change comes from understanding how the lived experiences of students on our campus differ from the community we intend to cultivate. Our hope is that the open sharing of this information will move us to engage in critical conversations that will further shift our campus culture to reflect the educational community free of violence and intimidation, and fully inclusive of all people, that we aspire to.

 

 

What is Sexual Misconduct/Violence?

Sexual misconduct/violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where an individual is incapable of giving consent due to an intellectual disability or use of drugs and/or alcohol. Sexual misconduct/violence can occur between friends, classmates, spouses, romantic interests, acquaintances or strangers. Examples of sexual violence include rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual harassment, and sexual coercion.  Dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking are also serious offenses.

Sexual harassment is also a form of sexual misconduct.  Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination on the basis of sex. Sexual harassment is unwelcomed conduct of a sexual nature. Unwelcomed conduct includes conduct that an individual did not solicit or incite and that the individual regarded as undesirable or offensive. Sexual harassment includes any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic status; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for academic or employment decisions affecting such individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's work or academic performance; or creating an intimidating or hostile work or educational environment.  Sexual Harassment can include:

 

 In January 2014, the Obama Administration released this PSA to focus attention on ending sexual violence on campuses.

Sexual Violence

Sexual violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against an individual's will; or where an individual is incapable of giving consent due to the use of drugs or alcohol or because of intellectual or other disabilities. With respect to any instances of sexual violence that involves the use of drugs or alcohol, it is the University's position that the use of drugs or alcohol never makes an individual at fault for sexual violence. A primary concern of the University is each individual's safety, and as such, any other rules violations will be addressed separately from the sexual violence allegations. A number of different acts fall into the category of sexual violence, including: rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion. All such acts of sexual violence are forms of sexual harassment. Use of the term "sexual harassment" throughout the policy includes sexual violence.

 

Gender Based Harassment

Gender based harassment includes verbal, non-verbal and physical acts of aggression, intimidation, or hostility based on an individual's gender identity or gender expression, even if those acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature. Gender identity is a person's internal, deeply-felt sense of being either male, female, something other, or in between. Gender expression is an individual's characteristics and behaviors such as appearance, dress, mannerisms, speech patterns, and social interactions that are perceived as masculine or feminine. Gender based harassment will exist if an individual is harassed either for exhibiting what is perceived as a stereotypical characteristic for their sex, or for failing to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity and femininity. Use of the term "sexual harassment" throughout the policy includes gender based harassment.

 

Sexual Orientation Harassment

Sexual orientation harassment includes verbal, non-verbal and physical acts of aggression, intimidation, or hostility based on an individual's actual or perceived heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality, or transsexuality. Use of the term "sexual harassment" throughout the policy includes sexual orientation harassment.

   

What is Consent?

 
Consent at IWU

Consent is defined as permission to act. It may be given by words or actions, so long as those words or actions create clear, mutually understood permission to engage in (and the conditions of) sexual activity. Consent must meet all of the following standards: 

  1. A person under the legal age to consent (17 years old in Illinois), or
  2. An individual who is known to be (or based on the circumstances should reasonably be known to be) mentally or physically incapacitated. An incapacitated individual is someone who cannot make rational, reasonable decisions because he or she lacks the capacity to understand the “who, what, when, where, why, or how” of a sexual interaction. This includes a person whose incapacity results from mental disability, sleep, involuntary physical restraint, unconsciousness, use of alcohol or other drugs.

(This information is adapted from the ATIXA Gender-Based and Sexual Misconduct Policy by the National Center for Higher Education Risk Management (NCHERM) and the Association of Title IX Administrators (ATIXA), 2011).

 

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