Courses in Literature and Culture Studies in English Translation are designed to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the literature/ culture of non-English speaking countries.  Depending on the course, students will be introduced to issues that are at the core of a national literature, culture, or linguistic practice.  These courses may focus either on one specific country (i.e., France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, Spain) or present specific trends that cut across geographical boundaries.  Readings, lectures, and discussions in English.

Course Descriptions:

  • LC 105 Special topics in Japanese Literature in Translation (LT)

    This course will vary in content and approach to emphasize genres, themes, and periods in Japanese literature.Readings and lectures in English. May count toward minor in Japanese. 

  • LC106/JPN306 Japanese Studies Through Popular Culture (CH, G)

    This course examines Japanese language, culture and history as observed in Japanese popular culture. Special focus is placed on analyzing cultural and historical illustrations in Anime.

  • LC 110 Playing Revolution (LT)

    Readings and lectures in English. Plays focusing on political rebellion or a revolution in ideas will be discussed in terms of historical background, film versions, and contrasting genres (poetic drama, classical drama, epic drama, documentary drama). Includes but is not limited to Goethe's Faust, Schiller's William Tell, and plays by Bertolt Brecht.Students must take Ger 387 instead, if majoring or minoring in German Studies. Offered in alternate years.

  • LC 112 German Romanticism (IT)

    Readings and lectures in English. The course explores German Romanticism in literature, philosophy, and music. One Wagner opera; and the influence of Romanticism on German nationalism, Nietzsche, and Thomas Mann will also be discussed. Readings include Schlegel, Fichte, Heine, Kleist, women in Romanticism, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Robert Schumann. Offered in alternate years. Students must take Ger 340 instead, if majoring or minoring in German Studies.

  • LC 115 Special Topics in German Literature in Translation (LT)

    This course will vary in content and approach to emphasize genres, themes and periods in German literature. Readings and lectures in English. May count toward major/minor in German. General credit category: Literature.

  • LC 116 German Postwar Cinema (AR, G)

    This comparative course focuses on the different cinematic traditions that emerged in East and West Germany. It addresses the interaction between socio-historical context and the creative process as seen through film structure, style and content. The course includes discussions of propaganda, avante garde, feature and popular cinema and films by Beyer, Dorrie, Fassbinder, Sanders Brahms, Staudte and Wolf. All lectures, materials and discussions are in English. Offered occasionally in alternate years.

  • LC 125 Special Topics in French Literature in Translation (LT)

    This course will vary in content and approach to emphasize genres, themes and periods in French literature. Readings and lectures in English.

  • LC 135 Special Topics in Hispanic Literature in Translation (LT)

    This course will vary in content and approach to emphasize genres, themes and periods in Hispanic literature. Readings and lectures in English.

  • LC 145 Special Topics in Russian Literature in Translation (LT)

    This course will vary in content and approach to emphasize genres, themes and periods in Russian literature. Readings and lectures in English. May count toward minor in Russian.

  • LC 165 Special Topics in Italian Literature in Translation (LT)

    This course will vary in content and approach to emphasize genres, themes and periods in Italian literature. Readings and lectures in English.

  • LC 170 Special Topics

    Introductory study of a wide variety of selected topics in literature and culture in translation, which are not covered in regular course offerings. This course may be repeated if teh subject matter differs. See current Program of Classes to determine if this course fulfills general education requirements. 

  • LC 202 Japanese Literature and Culture (LT, G)

    This course is a broad, but in-depth, introduction to Japanese literature and culture. Besides thematic and literary analyses, careful attention will also be given to the cultural, social, and historical factors that have created the various genres found in the Japanese language.

  • LC 205 Language and Culture in Japan (SI, G)

    The course aims at developing students' understanding and critical perspectives towards the dynamic relationship between the language use and cultural behavior in the Japanese society. Offered every other fall.

  • LC 207 Language and Gender (SI, G)

    This course considers gender differences in language use as practices of social institutions and investigates the ways in which the gender differences influence communication styles between men and women. This course also encourages students to reflect upon the advantages/ disadvantages that the gender differences create and consider how we can promote gender equality in society. Offered in alternate years.

  • LC 209/JPN309 Business Communication in Japanese Media (SI, G)

    Students learn common Japanese business phrases and idioms and explore communication practices inJapanese business settings and business systems. For Japanese 309 students, additionalassignments are done in Japanese to improve on their language skills.

  • LC 224 Cultural Questions and Contexts in African Film, 1960-present (LT, G)

    Students concentrate on socio-cultural, economic, and historical issues raised by African filmmakers while learning about African film history. The films and readings represent three major historical periods: the early days of independence struggles (late 50s early 60s), independence era films (1970s-1980s), and the postcolonial/ contemporary era (1990s to the present). Offered in alternate years.

  • LC 242 Strangers in Their Own Home: Yiddish Culture of Eastern Europe (IT, G)

    This course will examine the intellectual traditions that influenced the growth and development of Yiddish culture between 1800 and the present. The focus will be placed on traditional values in the life of the Jewish community in Russia and Eastern Europe, including their positive as well as restrictive impact on individual Jewish experience. The study of the intellectual traditions will be reflected through three major areas of human experience: literature, the arts, and film. Texts will be read in English translation. Fulfills General Education requirement in Intellectual Traditions and Global Diversity flab. May count toward Russian major/ minor. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 245 Russian Culture and Society Through Film (CH, G)

    This course will acquaint students with Russian cultural history focusing on the tremendous changes in the country from the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 to the present. The films selected for viewing and class discussion demonstrate cultural and socio-political conditions unique to Russia. Covers major events in the history of Soviet culture and the rapid and unpredictable changes in contemporary Russia. Offered in alternate years, fall semester.

  • LC 247 Fairy Tales of the 20th Century (AV)

    This course analyzes the ethical and philosophical values expressed through the early forms of culture-myth and folklore. It analyzes the transformation of the fairy tale into the literature, film, and popular beliefs of the 20th Century. Discusions are based on Russian fairy tales, literary texts, art, music and film, as well as Western interpretations of the traditional fairy tale values. All lectures and discussions are in English. Offered in alternate years.

  • LC 250 Dangerous Texts: Russian Literature and Politics (LT, G)

    This course will examine in translation "dangerous texts" of the 19th and 20th Century. Students will learns which characteristics of texts and their authors were seen as threats, how these threats were dealt with, and how all of these factors affected the very nature of writing and reading in Russia. Reading list includes works by Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov, and Mayakovsky. Fulfills General Education requirement in Literature and Global Diversity flag. May count toward Russian major/ minor. Offered each fall.

  • LC 260 Italian Cinema

    This course will focus on the development and evolution of Italian cinema proceeding chronologically from 1912 to the present. Particular attention will be paid to questions of national identity, gender and political and social history. The class will center on the viewing and discussion of films and will survey a broad spectrum of directors and styles. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. Knowledge of Italian not required. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 265 Renaissance Italy (IT)

    From its passion for antiquity to its contast with the Middle Ages, the Italian Rinascimento represents a turning point in Western history. The goal of this travel course is to introduce students firsthand to the art, architecture, literature, and history of Renaissance Italy. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Offered occasionally in May Term.

  • LC 270 Special Topics

    Intermediate study of a wide variety of selected topics in literature and culture in translation, which are not covered in regular course offerings. This course may be repeated if the subject matter differs. See current Program of Classes to determine if this course fulfills general education requirements. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 272 From Utopia to Science Fiction: Imagining the Future in Russia and Germany (IT)

    This course traces the development of utopian thought in the 20th and 21st centuries primarily in Russia and Germany, but also with select examples from other Central European countries. Special attention will be given to the dialogue between utopia/dystopia/anti-utopia/critical utopia and science fiction in prose, political texts, film, art and music. We will look at the utopian ideal in communism and in the context of post-communist culture touching upon aspects of gender, class, generation, technology, ecology, etc. All lectures, readings, and discussions are in English.

  • LC 273 Standing in the Shadows: Global Film Noir (AR)

    Examines the subdued crime thrillers produced since the mid-1940's. American, British, German, Italian, French, and Japanese films noir, two 21st century neo-noirs, and reading from scholarship on the genre form the basis of class discussions and assignments. Students will also learn rudimentary film production through two short film assignments. Offered as needed.

  • LC 274 The Superwoman of Central European Fiction and Film: (CHC, G, W)

    This course examines the role of women in Central Europe, including Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia through literature and film. It focuses on the process of identity formation of women and their struggle to come to terms with the failed promises of emancipation made by respective communist revolutions. In the process, it assesses the historical and cultural conditions of creating the New Socialist Personality, the communist ideal "superperson." The course also contains a comparative element with select authors from the former "West" and the experiences of women after the fall of the Iron Curtain. All course work is in English. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 304 Cross-Cultural Communications: US and Japan (AV, G)

    The main focus of the course is on the effects of cross-cultural communication between Americans and the Japanese on interpersonal relationships, but implications for the values reflected in mass communication, political equality, and educational opportunity are also discussed.

  • LC 308 Japanese Way of Life (IT, G)

    This course explores the development of Japanese thoughts from antiquity to the present, focusing on issues of continuity and change. Students will study the major intellectual movements in Japan over time and examine the impact that modern influences from the West have had on traditional Japanese language, culture, and society.

  • LC 347 The Moral Impulse in Russian Culture: Reading Leo Tolstoy (AV)

    Leo Tolstoy considered his primary task as a writer to influence and to shape the morality of the Russian nation. He viewed the family as the primary source of the moral development of the human being. The course will examine two of his works, Anna Karenina, and The Kreutzer Sonata and focus on family values - the questions of love, adultery, and moral responsibility - as they are expressed in these works. All lectures and discussions are in English. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 350 Terrible Perfection: Women in Russian Literature and Film (LT, G)

    In this course, we will examine the development of female characteristics in Russian literature and cinema. Special attention will be given to the women's role in Russian culture, society, and history. The course will focus on the investigation of the relationship between women and cultural traditions and women and political oppression. A wide range of Russian/ Soviet texts and films will be presented. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 370 Special Topics

    Advanced study of a wide variety of selected topics in literature and culture in translation, which are not covered in regular course offerings. This course may be repeated if the subject matter differs. See current Program of Classes to determine if this course fulfills general education requirements. Prerequisite: Gateway Colloquium. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 377 Studies in Comparative Literature

    Designed to investigate various aspects of literature in a comparative context. Treats two or more national literatures and will vary in content and approach. Offered occasionally.

  • LC 380 Introduction to Literary Theory

    Taught in English, this course introduces students to various formative stages of 20th-Century literary theory and their applications with emphases varying from year to year. Open to all students interested in literature. Offered occasionally.