Fall 2019 English and Journalism Course Descriptions

ENGL 101-2 Introduction to Creative Writing (AR)
TTh 8:00-9:15
Colleen Abel
Examines theory and practice of writing creatively. Reading combined with practice in the basic processes of and strategies for writing fiction, poetry, or drama. Offered annually.
Prerequisites: None.

ENGL 101-3 Introduction to Creative Writing (AR)
TTh 2:35-3:50
Kathleen Zurkowski
Compose an ode to your goldfish. Tell a story from the perspective of a liar. Improvise a sketch comedy that might make grandma blush. Cut up words from a newspaper and rearrange them into a poem. News flash: you don’t need a special gene to be creative. All you need is to develop your sense of play. This course involves in-class games and exercises that push us out of the ruts in our minds. Students will collaborate with each other in class to generate material and evaluate new work. They will learn how to make their initial efforts even better—more moving, more suspenseful, more hilarious—through thoughtful revision. Finally, through careful reading, students will learn from the experts, imitating the style of writers who keep them turning the pages at three a.m.
Prerequisites: None.

ENGL 101-4 Introduction to Creative Writing (AR)
TTh 10:50-12:05
Colleen Abel
Examines theory and practice of writing creatively. Reading combined with practice in the basic processes of and strategies for writing fiction, poetry, or drama. Offered annually.
Prerequisites: None.

ENGL 111-1 Latinx Fiction ( LIT, US DIVERSITY)
MWF 9:00-9:50
Kathleen O’Gorman
The Latinx literary renaissance, beginning in the 1980’s and continuing to this day, has produced some of the most important recent and contemporary writing in the U.S., including that by Pulitzer Prize winners like Oscar Hijuelos and Junot Daz, and the U.S. Poet Laureate 2015 – 2017, Juan Felipe Herrera. Readings will include fiction by such writers as Hijuelos and Daz, Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Cristina Henrquez, Richard Rodrguez, Gloria Anzalda, Jaime Manrique, Ana Castillo, Oscar “Zeta” Acosta, Cristina Garca, and Ernesto Quionez. We will study styles and structures of literary texts and the ways in which they function in the service of narratives of American life, with diverse cultural elements that contribute to the experience of Latinidad. Those elements may include the construction of identity in terms of race, class, gender, and sexuality; bilingualism and code-switching; the experiences of the exile, the immigrant, and the refugee; sense of place and displacement; the idea of home; the marketing of the Latinx identity; power, borders, community, and the family.  
Note: All of the texts are written in English, though some may include occasional phrases and passages in Spanish.
Prerequisites: None.

ENGL 170-3  Jane Austen and Economics (LIT) 
MWF 2:00-2:50
Pallabi Gupta
This course offers an interdisciplinary reading of Jane Austen’s novels by examining the financial behavior of her characters and associating them with modern day economic theories and concepts. The course studies how Austen’s early nineteenth-century understanding of happiness and prudence matches present-day economist understanding of contentment and rationality. 
Prerequisites: None.

ENGL 201-1 Writing Fiction (W)
TTh 9:25-10:40
Brandi Reissenweber
Workshop in reading and writing fiction.  The course will focus on the principles and techniques used by accomplished writers in their stories as well as on key elements of the story form.  Students will complete stories and develop a portfolio. 
Prerequisites: Gateway Colloquium .

ENGL 220-1 South Asian Studies: Text, Context, and Representation (LIT)
MWF 3:00-3:50
Pallabi Gupta
Focusing on prominent contemporary writers and artists from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, this course offers an introduction to South Asian literature, art, and culture. In addition to poetry and prose, the course also examines other prominent artforms emerging from these regions, such as paintings, music, and theater.
Prerequisites: Gateway Colloquium .

ENGL 243-1 Survey of English Poetry (LIT)
MWF 8:00-8:50
Joanne Diaz
In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, English poets investigated women’s chastity, scientific knowledge, the eros and violence of Greek and Roman mythology, and the profound burden of sin and despair during the Protestant Reformation. In this course, we will read poems by Thomas Wyatt, Philips Sidney, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, Mary Wroth, George Herbert, John Donne, and John Milton. We will consider the cultural contexts of these poets in order to understand the preoccupations of the early modern period. Offered occasionally.
Prerequisites: Gateway Colloquium.

ENGL 280-1 Understanding Literature (W)
TTh 2:35-3:50
Molly Robey
Understanding Literature is an introduction to literary study, designed for English majors and minors. Because no single course can cover the wide range of interpretive strategies employed in literary criticism today, much less survey its object of study, Understanding Literature offers a systematic smorgasbord of approaches and genres, designed to meet the following goals: to develop your vocabulary for talking about literature and your strategies for interpreting it; to give you practice in reading and writing about a variety of literary genres, in particular fiction, poetry, and drama; to introduce you to the use of secondary sources; and to engage you in the extended conversation of critical discourse.
Prerequisites: Gateway Colloquium .

ENGL 301-1 Seminar in Creative Writing: Ideas of Poetry/Poetry of Ideas  (AR)
MW 2:00-3:15
Michael Theune
The great Romantic poet William Blake writes, "I must create my own system or be enslaved by another man's." In this class, we will explore many of the ways that systems—processes, projects, and theoretical frameworks—have served the production of poetry in the past, and we will experiment with the ways systems can inform and inspire the creation of new poetry today. By semester's end, each class participant will devise a personal system for poem-making and self-publish a short collection of the poems arising from that system.
Prerequisites: ENGL 202 or consent of the instructor. This course may be waived by the instructor based on evaluation of student’s portfolio.  Priority enrollment given to writing concentration when necessary.

ENGL 381- Thinking Queer/Reading Queer (LIT, U)
MW 2:00-3:15
Molly Robey
This course introduces students to queer theory, a critical framework used to analyze gender and sexuality, and it immerses students in the interpretation of literature by gay, lesbian, queer, and trans-identified individuals as well as literature and films that take as their subject queer genders and sexualities.
Pre-requisite: Gateway Colloquium and one of the following: ENGL 280, HEALTH 330, PHIL 230, SOC 222, SOC 311, or WGS 101. 

ENGL 335-1 Internship in Professional Writing
James Plath
An internship taken with an off-campus business or organization for which writing is the intern’s primary responsibility.  On-campus internship credit is also possible if all-campus general requirements for an internship are met. Approval of the English faculty internship supervisor is required. Offered each semester, May Term, and summers. 

ENGL 352-1 American Lit. After 1865:   Realism, Naturalism, (Pre)Modernism (LIT) 
MF 11:00-12:15
Molly Robey
In the mid to late-nineteenth century United States, new technologies such as photography and telegraphy emerged, helping to precipitate the development of the literary movements of Realism and Naturalism. Realism represented a transformation in literary history, a move away from depictions of ideal or romanticized people and settings toward unembellished representations of the actual lived realities of the United States’ diverse peoples. The literary history of Realism likewise converged with significant developments in the physical and social sciences, including the discovery of evolution and the birth of eugenics. Fusing scientific concepts of biological and social determinism with Realism’s documentary impulse, Naturalism emerged as a subset of Realism concerned with the individual’s struggle against physical and social forces. This course traces this literary history from 1865 through the early twentieth-century emergence of literary modernism, examining the intersections of aesthetic form and social forces.
Prerequisite: Gateway Colloquium; 1 course from 109-170 or 220–259, plus 280. 

ENGL 363-1 Avant-Garde Fiction (LIT) 
TTh 10:50-12:05
Kathleen O’Gorman
In this course we will study experimental fiction in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on concerns of style and structure.  We will read texts that call into question the limits of representation and of genre, even as they make representational gestures within what seem to be standard genres (the short story and the novel). We will examine whether these fictional experiments represent an escape from the world or involve a different and perhaps more engaged response to it.  We will study texts by writers such as Maso and Danielewski (Americans), Calvino (Italian), Beckett (Irish), Fuentes (Mexican), Cortzar (Argentinian), and Kundera (Czech), among others.
Prerequisites:  Gateway Colloquium; plus 1 course from ENGL 109-170 or ENGL 220-259; plus 280. English 280 can be waived with the permission of the instructor.

ENGL 394-1 Death, Gender, Power (LIT)
TTh 8:00-9:15
Joanne Diaz
This course focuses on becoming familiar with Shakespeare’s comedies and histories, dramatic forms that dominated his attention in the early part of his career. The course will emphasize literary and dramatic strategies for reading the language, characters, and genres of these plays, as well as critical strategies for interpreting the plays within the cultural and historical context in which they originally functioned. In addition, we will survey the ways in which actors, educators, and archivists investigate the “meaning” of Shakespeare’s plays for our contemporary culture. Although we will concern ourselves primarily with the printed texts of Shakespeare’s plays, we will have to refer to actual productions, film adaptations, and staging possibilities as we try to untangle critical issues and cultural assumptions.  By the end of this semester, I hope that you will feel more confident in your ability to interpret and write about Shakespeare’s plays, and have a better sense of how you might help others engage with the excitements of Shakespeare’s text.
Prerequisites: Gateway Colloquium and one of the following; ENGL 280, THEA 241, HIST 290, 321, or 323. 

ENGL 401-1 Senior Writing Project (W) 
W 7:00-9:30
Brandi Reissenweber
Creative Writing Senior Seminar: Capstone experience for English-Writing majors requires thoughtful study of portfolio work and completion of an extensive, ambitious individual project that’s both a logical extension of the student’s work and a new challenge. The course will be multi-genre, with an emphasis on feedback and support.    
Prerequisites: At least one ENGL 300-level writing course and senior standing, or by permission of instructor.

ENGL 485-1 Directed Study-English
Brandi Reissenweber
Independent Study

ENGL 485-2 Directed Study-English
Michael Theune
Independent Study

FLM 110-1    Film Aesthetics (AR)
TTh 1:10-2:25
James Plath
Film is an art form, a cultural indicator, and a shaper of culture. The goal of this class is to acquaint students with the aesthetics and language of film, en route to their developing an appreciation for the medium along with being able to critically evaluate and write about films. Cinema is a huge field, and it is impossible to cover world cinema, or even every aspect of American filmmaking. Nonetheless, this introductory course will attempt to cover classic films, popular films, and indie films in order to give students a broad range of aesthetic tastes. The adult subject matter and profanity in several films we view may be offensive to some students, but that's the nature of cinema. Discussions will also be frank. If that makes you uncomfortable, perhaps you should find a different Gen Ed course. 
Prerequisites: None.

JOUR 397-1 Internship in Editing & Publishing
James Plath
This internship provides students with an opportunity to gain work experience in positions that emphasize editing, design, marketing, and other aspects of publishing and public relations. Section editors and assistant section editors for The Argus can also apply for this internship if the editor-in-chief is willing to serve as on-site supervisor. Approval of the English faculty internship supervisor is required. Offered each semester, May Term, and summers.