General Major Course Descriptions


Natural Science


ENST 115/PHYS 120 Energy and Society
This course will enable students to acquire a working knowledge of the fundamental science that underpins various energy technologies, and the manner in which these technologies interact with the environment. Students will conduct comparative analyses of the different energy choices that we might make, both as individuals and as a nation.

ENST/CHEM 130 Chemistry of the Environment
A survey of chemistry principles with an emphasis on the application of these principles to environmental topics such as air and water pollution, global warming, and energy. Laboratory experiments may involve analysis of water from local stream and lakes and the analysis of vegetables for pesticide residue. Fulfills general education requirements in Natural Sciences (Physical Science Lab). Offered occasionally.

ENST/CHEM 132 Atmospheric Pollution
Air quality is of extreme importance to both human health and environmental health. This course will include discussion of several atmospheric pollution issues, including pollution sources, reactions and transport in the atmosphere, pollution reduction efforts, and the energy needs that underlie many of the causes of the pollution. No prior knowledge of geology is needed, but a basic knowledge of chemistry will be assumed. Fulfills general education requirements in Natural Sciences (Physical Science Issues). Offered occasionally.

ENST/CHEM 135 Water Quality
The definitions of water quality depend heavily on the intended uses of the water supply - for drinking, irrigation, recreation, or ecosystem support. We will take a hands-on approach in studying water quality issues, using local water resources as case studies. A major part of the course will be field trips to measure and monitor water quality in local rivers and lakes. Fulfills general education requirements in Natural Sciences (Physical Science Lab). Offered occasionally

BIOL 164 Marine Realm
This course examines the inspiring diversity of marine life and investigates the interactions of humans with the marine environment. Credit will not be given toward the biology major or minor. Fulfills general education requirements in Natural Sciences (Life Science Issues) and Global Diversity. Offered each spring.

BIOL 217 Introductory Ecology
An introduction to the major concepts of ecology; the structure and function of ecosystems, population and community dynamics, and plant and animal adaptations. Four hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory/field work per week. Prerequisites: 101 and 102. Fulfills general education requirements in Writing Intensive. Offered each fall. 

PHYS 239 Problems of Nuclear Disarmament
An examination of reasons for the continual existence of nuclear weapons. Elementary atomic and nuclear physics, the physics of nuclear weapons and the results of their use. Consideration of possible approaches to nuclear disarmament and the responsibility of scientists with respect to disarmament. Literature and film, exploring the effect of nuclear warfare on life and culture in Japan. Fulfills general education requirements for Natural Sciences (Physical Science Issues) and Global Diversity. Offered annually.

ENST 250 Directed Readings in Environmental Studies, with approval of ES program director

BIOL 302 Parasitology
An in-depth study of the life histories of parasites and the medical, environmental, and economic impact of parasites to human and animal populations. Emphasis will be placed on evolution of parasite-host relationships and on the environmental consequences and cost of parasite treatment and control. Prerequisites 101, 102, or 107 and 108 or permission of the instructor. Fulfills general education requirements in Writing Intensive. Offered in alternate years, spring semester.

BIOL/ENST 321 Conservation Biology (prerequisite: ENST 120)
Ecological principles and conservation law and policy will serve as a basis to assess human impacts on biological diversity and to develop practical approaches to prevent species extinction. The course will include off campus lectures and field trips. The topics covered include extinction as an historical/contemporary process, invasive species, global climate change, endangered/threatened species conservation and watershed/ecosystem management. Offered in alternate years, spring semester

BIOL 350 Tropical Ecology
Introduction to the ecosystems, animals, and plants of Costa Rica, including issues associated with the preservation of bio-diversity. Studies will be conducted both in the field and in the classroom. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 227, declared minor in Environmental Studies, consent of instuctor. Fulfills general education requirements in Natural Sciences (Life Science Issues) and Global Diversity. Offered in May Term.

ENST 397 Internship, with approval of ES program director

 


Human Culture


ENGL 170 Radioactive: Writing in the Nuclear Age

ENGL 220 American Ground Zero

ENGL 220 Thinking like a Mountain: Literature and Environmental Consciousness

ENST/HIST 248 American Environmental History
Overview of American environmental history from pre-colonial days to the present. This course examines the relationship between social and ecological change, focusing on the impact of native American societies, Western colonialism, and market forces on land-use patterns, biodiversity and the development of the contemporary environmental movement in the United States. Fulfills general education requirement in Cultural Historical Change. Offered in alternative years, fall semester.

ENST 250 Directed Readings in Environmental Studies, with approval of ES program director

ENST/ANTH 282 Peoples and Cultures of East Africa
Survey of select east African societies whose cultural adaptations to varied ecosystems make interesting case studies for comparative analysis. Reveals the diversity and the congruity of human social systems. Fulfills general education requirements in Contemporary Social Institutions and Global Diversity. Offered in alternate years.

ANTH 288 Consuming Passions: The Anthropology of Food
Considers forms of human eating in historical and cross-cultural perspective. Examines various systems of subsistence, from hunting and gathering to horticulture to pastoralism, as well as the symbolic aspects of food choice. Fulfils general education requirements in Analysis of Values and Global diversity. Offered annually

HIST 360 Modern Brazil
An in-depth study of Brazilian history and culture from the independence period to the present. Brazil is the most populous Latin American nation with the world's eighth largest economy and fifth largest area. Offered in alternate years.

ENST 397 Internship, with approval of ES program director

 


Social Institutions


ENST/HIST 248 American Environmental History
Overview of American environmental history from pre-colonial days to the present. This course examines the relationship between social and ecological change, focusing on the impact of native American societies, Western colonialism, and market forces on land-use patterns, biodiversity and the development of the contemporary environmental movement in the United States. Fulfills general education requirement in Cultural Historical Change. Offered in alternative years, fall semester.

ENST 250 Directed Readings in Environmental Studies, with approval of ES program director

ENST/PSCI 261 Risk and Regulation
Contentions surrounding risk analysis continue to challenge the regulatory state. Many risks associated with technological change remain uncertain, and the information available is evaluated differently by scientists, citizens, and industry. The issues addressed include the use of DDT, the regulation of pesticides, the effectiveness of the Superfund legislation, and the debate over the precautionary principle. Cross-listed with Political Science 261. Offered in alternate years.

ENST/PSCI 260 American Environmental Politics
Basic introduction to the institutional and legal framework of contemporary American environmental policy and to environmental politics in the United States. Policy issues explored include water and air pollution, solid and hazardous waste, endangered species and wilderness preservation, energy development, growth management, and environmental justice. Fulfills general education requirements in Contemporary Social Institutions. Offered in alternate years, fall semester.

ENST/ANTH 282 Peoples and Cultures of East Africa
Survey of select east African societies whose cultural adaptations to varied ecosystems make interesting case studies for comparative analysis. Reveals the diversity and the congruity of human social systems. Fulfills general education requirements in Contemporary Social Institutions and Global Diversity. Offered in alternate years.

ANTH 288 Consuming Passions: The Anthropology of Food
Considers forms of human eating in historical and cross-cultural perspective. Examines various systems of subsistence, from hunting and gathering to horticulture to pastoralism, as well as the symbolic aspects of food choice. Fulfils general education requirements in Analysis of Values and Global diversity. Offered annually

ECON 340 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
The application of microeconomics to issues of the environment and natural resource use. Economic institutions are examined for their effects on the use of renewable and non-renewable resources. The economic causes of pollution and the available policy responses are explored. Prerequisite: ECON 100. Offered in alternate years.

SOC 344 Population and Environment
Studies the causes and consequences of population change. Topics include the principle of demography, the processes of fertility, mortality and migration, and the impact of population and technology on the natural environment. Offered in alternate years.

ENST/PSCI 360 Comparative Environmental Politics
Examination of how different political-economic systems shape the environmental policy process and impact the environment. This course considers how party-structure, mode of interest articulation, economic system and level of development affect environmental policy. Countries studied include the United States, Germany, former Soviet Union/Russia, China, India, Brazil and Nigeria. Prerequisite: a course in either political science or environmental studies strongly recommended. Fulfills general education requirements in Contemporary Social Institutions and Global Diversity. Offered alternate years, spring semester.

HIST 360 Modern Brazil
An in-depth study of Brazilian history and culture from the independence period to the present. Brazil is the most populous Latin American nation with the world's eighth largest economy and fifth largest area. Offered in alternate years.

ENST/PSCI 361 Globalization and the Environment
Introduction to the international politics behind efforts to deal with tropical deforestation, ozone depletion, global warming, loss of biodiversity and transnational transfer of hazardous wastes. Actors, conferences, and accords involved in the international environmental policy process are discussed, with particular attention to different positions of industrialized versus developing countries. Fulfills general education requirements in Contemporary Social Institutions and Global Diversity. Offered alternate years, spring semester.

ENST/PSCI 362 Cooperation in Environmental Policymaking: The Public-private Sector Nexus
The course begins on campus surveying some of the theoretical and empirical issues of US environmental policy followed by travel to a site where environmental policy is an active issue. Recent examples include the Appalachian mountain region, Georgia's Chattooga River, and California's Tuolumne River and the Navarro River Watershed. Offered in May Term.

ENST 397 Internship, with approval of ES program director